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sandy in the borough of queens in new york. >> there's people who have been without attention for a long time. some with, some without running water. definitely without power. you know, so as time goes, it gets worse. and i'm afraid if we don't like, really get this situation under control. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: israel and the militant group hamas slid closer to all-out war today. the israelis blasted gaza with scores of air strikes, and the palestinians said 16 people were killed there. hamas and its allies fired more than 200 rockets and even stru
: now, a report on the recovery from the superstorm sandy. new york governor andrew cuomo said today he intends to ask the federal government for at least $30 billion in aid. new jersey is still tallying its losses, and damages in the region are expected to exceed $50 billion. schools officially reopened today in one community along the jersey shore. but for the past week, teachers have been already hard at work, helping students deal with the aftermath of the storms. special correspondent john tulenko of learning matters filed this story from the town of belmar. >> reporter: hurricane sandy tore into belmar, new jersey. >> belmar was one of the towns you would continually hear about on the radio. families reported seeing four, five, six-foot wall of water >> how are you? reporter: lisa hannah is assistant principal at belmar's one elementary school. many of her students are recent immigrants. most of their families had nowhere else to go. >> i don't think anyone was really prepared for what happened >> reporter: inside this house three children and their parents were counting on luck.
, more than 400,000 syrians have fled to neighboring states. it's been two weeks since hurricane sandy walloped the northeast, and, as of today, more than 130,000 homes and businesses across new york and new jersey still were in the dark. new york city mayor michael bloomberg warned again the process of restoration and recovery will be slow. . a lot of residents unfortunately will be out of power for a long time. but rather than complain about it or even write about it, we're trying to do something about it. we can sit around and bring or hands and say it's terrible. mother nature brought us this storm. now we're just going to deal with it. we're going to go methodically street by street building by building and help people get going. we're going to do the most important life-threatening things first. and then we'll come back. we're not going to stop until everybody is back. >> holman: there also were more signs of progress today, as gasoline rationing ended in central and northern new jersey. rationing continues in new york city. wall street slid again today, amid concerns about impen
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